Trade and Globalization

Let's End America's "Middle East First" Policy

  • By
  • Michael Lind,
  • New America Foundation
February 1, 2011 |

The crisis in Egypt, however it plays out, provides Americans with an opportunity to reconsider the role of the Middle East in American foreign policy. Since the end of the Cold War, the U.S. has pursued a global grand strategy centered on the Middle East, while treating the rise of China as a secondary strategic concern. The growing costs of both excessive military intervention in the Middle East and inattention to China’s military and economic policies raise the question of whether America's obsession with the Middle East has been an expensive distraction.

The Future Is in Davos, and It's Medieval

  • By
  • Parag Khanna,
  • New America Foundation
January 28, 2011 |

There wasn't a single North American accent among them, but the show went on smoothly without anyone so much as noticing. Onstage were Gao Xiqing, president of the China Investment Corporation; Juan Carlos Echeverry, Colombia's Minister of Finance; and other figures from what used to be called "the South."

Don't Hate on Davos

  • By
  • Parag Khanna,
  • New America Foundation
January 28, 2011 |

This year is my 10th trudge up the "Magic Mountain" to attend the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland. I'm not Dmitry Medvedev, Bill Gates, or Jamie Dimon -- all of whom were visible in the Congress Center corridors today -- but like them, I wouldn't be here if it wasn't worthwhile. The critics who dismiss Davos as a waste of time are often those who were either not invited or not interested in making a contribution to anything beyond their own bottom line.

Getting Rebalancing Right

  • By
  • Samuel Sherraden,
  • New America Foundation
November 23, 2010 |

Ben Bernanke's most recent assessment of the world economy was phrased with the requisite diplomatic tact. "Persistent imbalances" in global trade, the U.S. Federal Reserve chairman explained in a speech at the European Central Bank on Nov. 19, "represent a growing financial and economic risk." But Bernanke's target was unmistakable: In what has become a constant refrain from the U.S. government, the Fed chief put the onus on China and other emerging markets for jeopardizing global recovery by not doing enough to reduce their trade surpluses. U.S.

The Next Boom: Building the Foundation of a New Strategic Era

October 25, 2010
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I am very excited that Paul Glastris and the good folks at The Washington Monthly have published my latest piece, co-authored with my colleague Chris Leinberger of the Brookings Institution. It's called The Next Real Estate Boom: How housing (yes, housing) can turn the economy around.

A Recovery At Risk

  • By
  • Sherle R. Schwenninger,
  • Samuel Sherraden,
  • New America Foundation
October 11, 2010

Click here to download the slideshow, "A Recovery at Risk."

The Challenges and Opportunities of an Urban World

Friday, October 8, 2010 - 9:00am

The International Housing Coalition (IHC), Foreign Policy magazine and the New America Foundation's Global Assets Project sponsored an interactive discussion on The Challenges and Opportunities of an Urban World, in celebration of World Habitat Day 2010.

Plan B for Obama

  • By
  • Thomas Palley,
  • New America Foundation
September 6, 2010

Mr. President:

With hopes of a V- or U-shaped recovery fading, there is the increasing prospect of an L-shaped future of long stagnation, or even a W-shaped future in which W stands for something worse. The reason for this dismal outlook is economic policy is trapped by failed conventional thinking that can only deliver wage stagnation and prolonged mass unemployment.

Your administration’s current economic recovery program has been marked by four major failings:

Monetary Policy’s Role in America’s Economic Recovery

  • By Joseph Gagnon, Peterson Institute for International Economics
September 6, 2010

At this year’s Jackson Hole conference for central bankers, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke admitted that the economic recovery so far this year has been “somewhat less vigorous than we expected,” but he expressed hope that the economy would return to a more satisfactory growth rate next year.  Considering that the Fed was already projecting a markedly slower recovery than America experienced after previous deep recessions, the Fed’s economic objectives are far too modest.  Ideally, the US economy should be growing at a 5 percent rate in 2010 and 2011 to recover lost ground and get work

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